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Grammar 101


Rockpen

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@this is the end: haha nice one bro, homophonics? :) your shit vs you are shit sounds the same but different meaning.

Off topic brother, what is proper :

I had paid OR I have paid or I paid? I always mixed up these past participles. The thought is I want to state that the loan is paid.

By the way nice avatar :)

Edited by Patrick
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Off topic brother, what is proper :

I had paid OR I have paid or I paid? I always mixed up these past participles. The thought is I want to state that the loan is paid.

 

 

'Di ko nakita 'to. Anyway, all are correct depending on the usage?

 

I googled to make sure since I go by the kung ano 'yung magandang pakinggan principle which is unreliable just like politicians.

 

Present Perfect: I have paid (e.g. I have paid my loan) - two verbs, the auxiliary have and the past participle which is paid. It's used more like a connector for the present and the recent past and the point of the sentence is the resulting action which in this case you already paid your loan rather than when it was paid. There are several other usage and I've included links bellow for reference. 

Past tense: I paid (e.g. I paid the loan yesterday)

Past Perfect: I had paid (e.g. I had paid my loan before the loan shark sent his goons after me) - same as with the present perfect tense but using the auxiliary had. It's used to indicate an action happened before something else happened.

 

If in doubt just say Me paid loan. Me smart. :D

 

Corrections are welcome as always.

 

Source:

http://bit.ly/1Vacsfz
http://bit.ly/264SDcz
Edited by This_Is_The_End
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  • 2 weeks later...

I think it's UNGRATEFUL... because it comes from the word 'gratitude' which means the state of being grateful. It comes from the Latin, 'gratus' = pleasing. Great has a different meaning altogether.

GREAT [ɡrāt/ ]- adjective
1. Of an extent, amount, or intensity considerably above the normal or average.
2. Of ability, quality, or eminence considerably above the normal or average.

But whenever I see "ungreatful" being used ... I consider it to be a synonym of the correct one. :D

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Bro @this is the end, correct me if I am wrong pero diba parang jargon lang yun? parang lage gamit yun ng mga English man.. Parang tama ka yung Til ang correct. Parang yung word na 'defense' or 'defence'.

 

I didn't look for the etymology of the word but yeah luma na 'yan although it's still being used today. I checked several sites and the consensus is it can be interchanged. A few examples, Tarantino's movie From Dusk Till Dawn, Gin Blossom's Til I Hear It From You, A 2006 film called 'Til Death. One can argue though na with titles, people can and will claim artistic or poetic license for some minor grammatical or spelling inconsistencies but apparently in this case, all three are correct.

Edited by This_Is_The_End
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  • 11 months later...
On 4/6/2016 at 10:38 AM, Rockpen said:

Bear With Me or Bare With Me: What’s the Difference?

29ZUj.jpg

English homophones are one of the most confusing parts of the language. There are hundreds of them; they all sound the same; and their spellings generally aren’t that different either.

Such is the case with today’s words: bear vs. bare. Not only do these words by themselves confuse writers, but they are also found in many different English phrases, which further leaves writers unsure of which word to use.

Lage ito ginagamit sa taong nakikiusap na pakinggan siya.. Pero alin ba ang tama "please bare with me" or "please bear with me".

May prof ako dati na babae super pretty and sexy. German prof namin sa Philo.. Lage niya sinasabi na "please bear/bare with me". Minsan natatawa ako dahil sa madumi utak ko. Iba kasi naiimagine ko. Sablay nanaman. :))

In this sentence, "bear" means "stay". So bear is the correct word. In the sentence "Please bare with me.", it sounds like the speaker is inviting you to strip or get naked with her...

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